How do they fly so high? Wingsuit pilots get a ridiculous amount of air diving into canyon

Just in case your day hasn’t had enough excitement, here’s a video of some wingsuit pilots diving into a canyon.

Diving in the American Southwest, daredevils in Squirrel wingsuits were looking to pull up out of their dives to see how high they could fly back upwards into the air. They needed conditions to be just right and had no room for mistakes…

Awesome – so how do wingsuit pilots achieve such control in the air? And how do they climb to such heights?

“Flying a wingsuit is very intuitive, small inputs are needed,” Matt Gerdes, Squirrel’s chief test pilot who features in the video, told the Press Association. “We can fly them with precision, maybe not to centimetres but certainly to metres. Pilots can hit targets, for example.”

The divers fly past a marker
(Screengrab/Vimeo/Squirrel)

“By diving for speed, and then changing our AoA (Angle of Attack), we convert that speed into lift and altitude,” said Gerdes. “The best pilots in the best wingsuits can gain around 90m of altitude.”

The makers say altitude gains shown in the video were measured based on calculations from multiple camera angles and, in some cases, using GPS tracking.

One of the wingsuit pilots climbing
(Screengrab/Vimeo/Squirrel)

Squirrel is a collaboration between some of the world’s top skydivers, wingsuit pilots and BASE jumpers. The equipment used by pilots in the video is all made by Squirrel, which makes wingsuits, parachutes and various gear for extreme sports.

Email Updates

Receive our lunchtime briefing straight to your inbox

More in this Section

George Osborne is enjoying his new role if the front page of the Evening Standard is anything to go by

This website turns Donald Trump's tweets into poems with hilarious results

How politics across the water seems to be following classic horror movie tropes

Philip Pullman set to name character after Grenfell Tower victim as a result of charity auction


Today's Stories

Judges warn of ‘flaws’ in judicial reform

Half of sexual violence centre’s clients did not report incident to gardaí

Couple separated for first time in 63 years of marriage

Man burnt neighbour’s van over spying fears

Lifestyle

Inistearaght: The Blasket that looks like a Skellig

Meet the woman turning the oceans’ trash into photographic gold

20 years later, people are still spellbound by Harry Potter

A passion for Harry Potter - the books that taught a generation about friendship, courage and learning

More From The Irish Examiner