BUSINESS FEATURES - IRISH EXAMINER

Brexit debate: No fun in seeing Britain become the next Greenland

“Voting for Brexit would be a bit like letting the animals out of the zoo. You know you shouldn’t do it, but it would be fun to see what happens. Imagine seeing a lion in Aldi”.

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Why Netflix isn’t a Euro giant

Perhaps the biggest reason Europe hasn’t produced digital economy giants like Google, Amazon, Facebook, or Netflix is that there’s no such thing as “Europe”.

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2016 jobs rising, but focus must be on quality not quantity

I had previously believed that the health of the labour market would have had a major bearing on the outcome of the February general election, but that belief was naive.

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The real challenge for Ryanair will be to replace Michael O’Leary

One could mistakenly think that, with his successes to date, Ryanair chief executive, Michael O’Leary, might be kicking his heels a little. After all, he runs the biggest airline in Europe. It is highly profitable and Mr O’Leary’s success has been well-rewarded.

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Challenging the structures used to produce and sell food

Fintech is a buzzword that has developed in financial markets. It refers to companies that combine technology with financial services to introduce new competition in the vast banking and insurance markets.

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Cold-coffee boom starts to pour out across the US

A lightbulb moment by a US coffee executive while cruising in the Caribbean has created a boom product, writes Jennifer Caplan.

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Markets not taking account of Fed plans for rate increases

The euro has generally had the upper hand against the dollar this year, climbing from $1.08 to as high as $1.16 at one stage, despite the further loosening of monetary policy by the ECB, including cuts to interest rates.

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Running out of excuses not to cut costly mortgage rates

The interest rate charged to an Irish borrower wishing to take out a new mortgage or to switch mortgage is the highest in the eurozone. The rate is not just a bit higher, it is way higher. The average rate for new business is 3.7% in Ireland compared with 2% across the eurozone.

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Income or revenue? - Sizing up Donald Trump’s wealth

Donald Trump has once again made his income and wealth objects of fascination and confusion in the US 2016 presidential race, this time, by filing an updated personal financial disclosure form with the Federal Election Commission.

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Credibility of Central Bank at risk

I am confused about how our ‘new politics’ is meant to work. I am less and less convinced that it will deliver the optimal outcome for the country.

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Better for all if UK stays in the EU tent

As the country finally cobbles together a Government after months of dithering ‘will they won’t they’, one newly appointed junior minister’s major concern appears to be about relaxing the smoking ban in pubs and restaurants. That he is the junior health minister with specific responsibility for disability makes it all the more surreal.

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Ireland's economy still largely dependent on trade winds

Ireland’s status as a small open economy, and its dependence on external developments, is being brought into sharp relief by unfolding events.

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Bank of England governor Mark Carney illustrates Brexit risks

As expected, the May meeting of the Bank of England’s Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) last week concluded with no changes to policy.

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Irish whiskey exporters could be in for a windfall

Irish whiskey producers may hit their target of doubling export sales much sooner than their planned 2020 date, if the UK votes them out of the EU on June 23.

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Brexit could yet be swayed by the gut, not the brain

Kyran Fitzgerald imagines the economic repercussions of the UK choosing to leave the EU. It would be a process rather than a sudden event, but businesses need to be prepared for it.

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Water charge dithering is resulting in low ‘tax morale’

Last week I received a bill from Irish Water. By temperament, I usually pay these things without too much analysis.

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Ashley Madison hack pays off for Cork-based cyber security company

A Cork company has reaped the benefits of such high-profile cases as the Ashley Madison cyber-theft, writes Trish Dromey.

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Social trust is good for economic growth

Would you trust a banker?

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Politics in Ireland is in a mess and we have the government we deserve

Economist, Jim Power, has found the past week profoundly anger-inducing and depressing in equal measure.

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Banks likely to resist home loan rates cut

No doubt, it is only coincidental that no sooner had Fianna Fáil resurrected a bill that would give powers to the Central Bank to impose ceilings on mortgage interest levels that AIB announced it would be reducing its mortgage variable rate from July.

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No room for Luddites - we need Ludgate-type platforms for rural Ireland

Luddites were 19th century English textile workers who feared technology would end their trade. The term is used to describe people who resist change.

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No interest rate hikes on horizon - at least for now

The fragile tone to sentiment on financial markets this year has carried over into May.

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Scottish voters could be key to Britain’s EU poll outcome

Question: What do you call a British europhile who needs the UK to vote to leave the EU in the June 23 referendum? Answer: A Scot.

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Brexit shows the need for EU reform

Last week I looked at the potential impact of Brexit on the UK economy and concluded that in the short term it would be very negative for the economy, but the longer-term impact would depend on what sort of trade deal the EU would agree with Britain.

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Bouncing us into the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership is wrong

There is a clear resonance between the fears expressed by Greenpeace regarding the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the fears expressed in the report on debt by the Debt and Development Coalition Ireland (DDCI).

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Fortunes can be made from share turmoil

Deflation is everywhere. This month electricity prices are falling. Variable interest rates are being cut. Fuel prices at the pumps have been coming down for the past two years.

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US weakness is likely to be temporary

Data released late last week showed that the US economy expanded at a very weak annualised rate of 0.5% in quarter one this year, following the sluggish growth of 1.4% recorded in the final quarter of 2015. 

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BHS and Clerys highlight the urgency for labour law reform

Pension funds have been badly run in the UK, but in Britain a protection fund exists. No such system exists here, says Kyran FitzGerald.

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Murphy Marine Services pushing the boat out in Valentia

Trish Dromey looks at a Valentia-based business making waves in the competitive world of boat building.

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Democratise the Seanad and utilise it

In ancient Rome there was a political office called the Censor.

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