WikiLeaks will reportedly only give tech firms extra security info once they've agreed to its conditions

WikiLeaks still hasn’t given tech companies the information they need to plug potential security holes in their systems.

According to Motherboard, the whistle-blowing website is making them agree to certain demands before it passes on the information.

Julian Assange’s site has contacted the firms concerned with a list of conditions and, according to some sources, it has given them a 90-day deadline to comply.

WikiLeaks initially seemed unsure about whether it should give more information to the companies, including Google, Apple, Microsoft and Samsung, when it published the Vault 7 files in early March.

The Vault 7 leak alleges the CIA took advantage of security vulnerabilities to develop ways of using products like smart TVs to listen in on the public.

After the files were published, WikiLeaks said it would give the companies extra information on gaps in their security systems so they could be plugged.

Motherboard quotes internal sources from the tech firms as saying they’ve been asked by WikiLeaks to agree to certain conditions before being given the data, with one mentioning a three-month deadline to fix the problems as part of the deal.

The site’s exact demands are not known.

Multiple sources told Motherboard the companies concerned are in a difficult position, with security departments currently waiting on legal advisers to make a decision on what action to take.

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