This futuristic unmanned aircraft combines technology for maximum effect

This could be the future of military aviation.

(BAE Systems)

It is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with technology which allows it to switch between fixed-wing flight and rotary-wing flight on the same mission.

That means it benefits from vertical take-off and landing as well as the ability to hover, thanks to its rotary wings.

Once airborne, it can switch to fixed-wing mode for greater speed and range.

A computerised fleet of the aircraft – in simulated action – can be seen in a mock-up video created by BAE Systems which developed the technology with students from Cranfield University.

(BAE Systems)

A spokesman for BAE Systems said: “This novel technology could allow UAVs to better adapt to evolving future battlefield situations and, through working together in a swarm, tackle sophisticated air defences as well as operating in complex and cluttered urban environments.”

Underpinning the machines is adaptive flight control and advanced navigation and guidance software.

Engineers at BAE Systems envisage take-off/landing attached to a pole to avoid strong winds or sideways movement throwing it off course. The aircraft would slide up or down them to take off as though on a firemen’s pole.

(BAE Systems)

The spokesman added: “The pole constrains the lateral or sideways movement of the UAV when being launched or recovered so strong winds cannot dislodge them and avoids any damage to personnel nearby. This is particularly important when recovering a UAV to the aft of a ship or a land vehicle.

“The pole’s gyro-stabilised element also ensures that it remains upright independently of the host vehicle’s orientation, which may be rolling if on a ship, or in the case of a land vehicle driving up or down a slope at the time of the launch or recovery.”


More in this Section

AOL Instant Messenger is officially dead and it’s making us feel all kinds of nostalgic

All you need to know as Apple TV app is finally available in the UK

The International Space Station is getting its own screening of The Last Jedi

Deezer launches Shazam-rivalling song recognition feature


Today's Stories

Jerry McCabe’s garda son successfully appeals assault conviction

‘Electrical appliances a fire risk when you’re out of house’, says senior fireman

Defilement left vulnerable teenager ‘in a very dark place’

Minister Eoghan Murphy supports Eighth Amendment reforms

Lifestyle

Review: N.E.R.D - No One Ever Really Dies: Their finest album to date

Everyone's mad at Google - Sundar Pichai has to fix it

Scenes from the analogue city - Memories of Limerick from the late 80s and early 90s

Ask Audrey: 'I heard that Viagra fumes from Pfizer’s were causing stiffys below in Ringaskiddy'

More From The Irish Examiner