Man gets apology from publishers and authors who linked him with Kinahan crime cartel in book

By Ann O'Loughlin

The publishers and authors of a book about the Kinahan crime cartel have apologised in the High Court to a Dublin man and stated he has no association with the Hutch or Kinahan gangs.

The apology was made before the High Court to Derek Cervi.

Mr Cervi had sued publisher Penguin Random House Ireland Limited and the authors, journalists Owen Conlon and Mr Stephen Breen, of the book "The Cartel - The Shocking true story of the rise of the Kinahan crime cartel and its deadly feud with the Hutch gang".

Mr Cervi, Russell Avenue, East Wall, Dublin 3, said the book had wrongly stated he was arrested and later released without charge by gardaí.

He said he was not arrested at any stage by gardaí.

He claimed the book, which was published in May, also wrongly linked him to criminality.

Mr Cervi said he has never been involved in criminality.

He also said the book has brought him unwanted attention and he is concerned for his and his family's safety.

As well as seeking damages, Mr Cervi also sought orders correcting what he claimed were defamatory statements and that all unsold copies of the book be recalled.

When the case was called before Mr Justice Richard Humphreys today the court was informed by Martin Hayden SC for Mr Cervi the proceedings have been resolved.

As part of the settlement an apology to Mr Cervi was read to the court by Cian Ferritter SC on behalf the publisher and the authors.

The apology acknowledged and accepted "there was an erroneous reference to Mr Cervi having been arrested" in the book.

"This was incorrect and the defendants accept that Mr Cervi was not arrested and that he has no association with the Hutch or Kinahan gangs.

"Penguin have agreed to correct this error in all forthcoming publications of the book," counsel said.

The defendants also apologised for the"upset and distress that this has caused to Mr Cervi and his family," the apology concluded.

Mr Justice Humphreys welcomed the resolution of the proceedings.


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