Ireland’s revolutionary years captured in ’Atlas of the Irish Revolution’

The most comprehensive treatment of Ireland’s revolutionary years has been published today by Cork University Press.

Edited by John Crowley, Mike Murphy, Donal Ó Drisceoil with associate editor John Borgonovo, The Atlas of the Irish Revolution promises to be one of the publishing events of the year.

Following the unprecedented critical and commercial success of the Atlas of the Great Irish Famine (2012), the Atlas of the Irish Revolution brings the same engaging and detailed treatment to the Irish revolutionary period.

With just under 1000 pages, weighing 5kg - and featuring hundreds of maps, photographs, paintings and other illustrations – this spectacular volume is the most comprehensive treatment of Ireland’s revolutionary years ever produced.

Broadcaster and historian John Bowman describes it as ‘outstanding . . . accessible, readable and brilliantly produced.’

RTE’s Joe Duffy has said: ‘The book of the year has just been published. President Higgins has described the Atlas of the Irish Revolution as a "scholarly masterpiece”. Check it out at your local bookshop. I promise it will be a revelation’.

The Atlas presents the history of the Irish Revolution in a vivid and exciting way, using many photos and archival documents that have rarely been seen by the Irish public.

It covers all the key events and episodes from 1912 to 1923 – the Home Rule Crisis, the First World War and Easter Rising, the First Dáil and the War of Independence, the Treaty and Civil War – but also features sections on the roots of the revolution in the 19th century; the impacts, outcomes and legacies of these turbulent years; and how they have been remembered in literature, on film, in art and through public memorials.

Over 140 separate contributions from the leading scholars of the era deal with the revolution in all its complexity. Stories of individuals and parishes sit alongside large thematic and international studies to give a multifaceted picture of these transformative years.

As well as detailed military and political accounts, the often neglected roles of women and workers are given their due, as are the experiences of Ulster Unionists, Southern Protestants and Irish people in British uniform.

The crucial role of the Irish diaspora is also featured in this exhaustive and stimulating volume that is a must-have for anyone with an interest in how modern Ireland came into being.

‘We were looking for a way to celebrate this Decade of Centenaries, and this project is UCC’s contribution to the Decade celebrations,’ said Mike Collins, Publications Director, Cork University Press. ‘We believe it’s the definitive publication for this critical period in Irish history.’

The Atlas of the Irish Revolution will be available in all good bookshops and online from 7th September, price €59.00

Copies may be ordered directly from www.corkuniversitypress.com


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