15-year-old sent for trial in relation to knife robbery

A 15-year-old boy, who allegedly tried to stab a shop worker during a robbery, has been sent forward for trial in the Dublin Circuit Criminal Court.

The boy, who is on bail, had been charged at the Children’s Court with possessing a knife, robbery, violent disorder and assault, at an off-licence, in Tyrellstown, Dublin, on May 20 last.

Judge Bryan Smyth heard that the teen had been served with the book of evidence and he ordered that the case was to go forward for trial at the Dublin Circuit Criminal Court.

A 16-year-old boy, who is also charged with assault causing harm to the shop worker was also sent forward for trial.

In an outline of the allegations, Garda Karl Smyth, Blanchardstown station, had told the court that a group of teenagers entered the off-licence. “Two of the four produced knives,” he had said.

He had alleged the 15-year-old “tried to stab the store worker”.

He had told the judge that the shop employee ran but was punched by the defendant and also suffered minor injuries.

Earlier it had been held that the case was too serious to be retained in the Children’s Court and should be sent to the Circuit Court which can impose lengthier sentences.


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