56-acre farm near Millstreet with lots of road frontage

North Cork is a busy area in terms of mixed agricultural activity, writes Conor Power.

This is a part of the country where traditionally, a lot of mid-sized holdings dominate, with a mixture of land grades typical of a patchwork of vibrant agricultural activity, backed up by a progressive co-operative movement.

A substantial 56-acre holding near the village of Cullen is as good an example as any of farms in this part of the country.

Located in the townland of Lyrevocane, about 4km from Cullen and 30km east of Mallow, this is a farm of good quality land that will benefit from more work being done to it, but it’s already a useful and productive holding, according to Millstreet-based auctioneer Catherine Pomeroy of Dick Pomeroy & Company.

“It’s all in grass,” says Catherine, “and it’s all good quality land.”

A public road running in a north-south direction forms a natural division of the farm into two, creating the possibility of three lots in all.

Lot 1 consists of the entire holding, Lot 2 is a 36-acre parcel on which the derelict house and outbuildings are located, and Lot 3 is a 20-acre non-residential piece of land.

On the 36-acre section, a passageway from the very generous length of road frontage leads to the old farmhouse and yard.

While the dwelling and much of the ancillary buildings are in a derelict or semi-derelict condition, the cubicle shed is in a workable condition according to the agent, and is suitable for 34 weanlings.

Aerial view of the 56 acres for sale at Lyrevocane near Mallow

In any case, the old house and curtilage is surrounded by some mature woodland, and for the right client looking perhaps to create a homestead for some hobby farming, this is a scenario that presents a perfect opportunity.

The hay barn and cattle crush are both in need of repair, but can be converted to a number of possible uses, depending on the requirements of the next owner.

The location near the Kerry border is quite central.

Millstreet is 8km to the south, Boherbue is 10km north, while Rathmore over the border in Kerry is 13km, and Killarney is 34km to the west.

The farm is roughly equidistant from both Mallow and Killarney, and lies approximately 3km from the N72 main road.

The immediate area has benefitted from a local population that has been on the rise of late, as the new national school in Cullen attests, according to the agents.

There are no entitlements going with the property, but Catherine says that interest so far has been strong, with a good level of enquiries, and the first offer awaited, at the time of writing.

There are plenty of progressive dairy farmers in the area, as well as from other sectors, particularly in cattle.

Being so close to Kerry, another factor that cannot be dismissed is that of the Kerry Co-op shares, whose effect is still being felt in the form of a good number of cash-rich farmers in the county.

“It has electricity and mains water,” she says. “It’s all suitable for silage with the exception of about four acres.”

The price expectation is modest enough, at €475,000.

At €8,500 per acre, it’s below the average price of land.

With the possibility of spreading the net wide that the splitting into lots offers, one would imagine that this workable land with its good access and multiple options should find a good number of suitors at that level.

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