Scott confirms 'Blade Runner' follow-up, but without Ford

Ridley Scott has suggested Harrison Ford is "too old" for the 'Blade Runner' sequel.

The 74-year-old director confirmed the follow-up to his hit 1982 sci-fi thriller is definitely happening but he is still unsure as to whether 70-year-old Harrison will return to play lead character Rick Deckard.

Ridley said: "It's not a rumour - it's happening. With Harrison Ford? I don't know yet. Is he too old? Well, he was a Nexus-6 so we don't know how long he can live. And that's all I'm going to say at this stage."

Ridley also revealed an insight into to the storyline of a sequel to his hit film 'Prometheus' - which made $400 million worldwide after its release earlier this year and became the 10th highest grossing film of 2012.

He revealed the sequel is to pick up where the first film left off, with Dr Elizabeth Shaw (Noomi Rapace) setting off in search of the Engineers with the severed head of David the android (Michael Fassbender).

He added to Metro newspaper: "Prometheus evolved into a whole other universe. You've got a person with a head in a bag that functions and has an IQ of 350. It can explain to her how to put the head back on the body and she's gonna think about that long and hard because, once the head is back on his body, he's dangerous."

When asked if the film was as simple as he makes it sound, he joked: "I wish it was that easy. They're going off to paradise but it could be the most savage, horrible place. Who are the Engineers?"

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