'No plans' for Harry Potter And The Cursed Child film, Rowling's rep says

Harry Potter fans who got their hopes up that the new stage play will be turned into a film have had them sorely dashed.

Harry Potter And The Cursed Child is author JK Rowling’s sequel to her successful book series, set 19 years after the Deathly Hallows and following the now grown-up boy wizard as his middle child Albus Severus starts at Hogwarts.

Jamie Parker, Sam Clemmett and Poppy Miller who will play Harry Potter, Albus Potter and Ginny Potter respectively in the Harry Potter And The Cursed Child stage play (Charlie Gray / Press Association Images)

Many international fans were disappointed that the play would only show in London and expressed hopes for a big-screen adaptation so they too would be able to experience the magic.

In February, Rowling denied that a film would be made, although she announced that a script version of the play would be available from July 31 – her and Harry’s joint birthday – which has been a minor salve to fans.

However, a request to trademark the West End play registered by the film’s makers sparked rumours of a film version.

Warner Bros Entertainment Inc submitted a trademark application on July 8 for The Cursed Child, according to the official UK Intellectual Property Office website.

But a spokeswoman for Rowling has now broken everyone’s heart.

Fans will have to make do with a Fantastic Beasts And Where To Find Them trilogy (Warner Bros)

She said: “This type of trademarking is standard practice.

“Harry Potter And The Cursed Child is a stage play, with no plans for there to be a film.”

You’ll have to make do with the upcoming Fantastic Beasts films until Rowling sees sense, it seems.


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