Craig now best-paid Bond actor

Daniel Craig is the highest-paid James Bond star ever, it has emerged.

The 44-year-old actor - who reprised his role as the iconic British spy for the third time in 'Skyfall' - will earn £31m (€38.6m) to portray the suave secret agent in two more movies, dwarfing the pay cheques received by his predecessors.

Sean Connery was the first actor to play Bond in 1962, earning £10,000 (€12,461) to star in 'Dr No'. His salary steadily rose, with the average pay for his work on six films in the franchise averaging at £218,000 (€271,665) - around £3m (€3.73m) in today's prices.

George Lazenby earned £340,000 (€423,697) - the equivalent of £460,000 (€573,237) - for his one outing as 007 in 'On Her Majesty's Secret Service', while Roger Moore brought home an average of £1.4m (€1.74m), or £6.3m (€7.85m) today, from his seven films.

Timothy Dalton also averaged £1.4m (€1.74m) for his two films, while Pierce Brosnan's average amounted to £6.1m (€7.6m), or £8.7m (€10.8m) in today's prices.

Craig's new deal brings his pay average to £9.6m (€12m) per film.

The huge contract surpasses the £10.7m (€13.33m) he earned for 'Skyfall', which at the time overtook the £10.3m (€12.8m) Pierce Brosnan took home for starring in 2002 Bond movie 'Die Another Day'.

Craig - who is married to Rachel Weisz - has seen his salary in the role take a huge jump, having earned £1.9m (€2.36m) for his 2006 debut 'Casino Royale' and £4.4m (€5.5m) for 2008's 'Quantum of Solace'.


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