Paolo Nutini poses for photo with one of his favourite buskers in Cardiff: a singer from Cork

A busker from Cork who was performing in Cardiff city centre during the week was surprised to be approached by best-selling Scottish musician Paolo Nutini, writes Denise O'Donoghue.

Dylan Brickley, who has been busking for five years, spotted a familiar figure watching him sing in the Hayes shopping area last Thursday.

He thought it was a Paolo Nutini-lookalike before realising it was actually the singer himself.

Paolo complimented Dylan's performance and left a tip before heading away.

Dylan was still starstruck when he bumped into Paolo for the second time yesterday. This time the pair chatted and posed for a photo together.

Paolo Nutini,left, poses for a photo with Dylan, right.

"It was unreal to meet him but it just felt unbelievable because he is so normal and down to earth. A good guy," Dylan told us.

"The best thing about it was he stopped to listen. I was delighted with that because something I was singing caught his attention."

24-year-old Dylan lives in Cork but visits Cardiff regularly as he used to study at Swansea University.

Paolo Nutini is best known for hits including Jenny Don't Be Hasty, Last Request, and Candy.

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