Coty to close in Nenagh with loss of more than 200 jobs

Latest 4pm: It has been confirmed that the Coty cosmetic plant in Nenagh, Co Tipperary is to close with the loss of over 200 jobs.

The company says they will be consolidating their operations into two core centres and will close by December of next year.

In 2015 the plant took over the Proctor and Gamble facility, which had been in operation in Nenagh since 1978.

Local TD Michael Lowry says everyone is shocked.

"It's devastating news here for Nenagh," he said.

"It's a crushing and disastrous day for the workforce and their families. It's a massive personal loss to those that have lost their jobs and their livelihood."

Latest 3.30pm: Services such as briefing sessions and information about redundancy and welfare have been offered to workers at the Coty beauty products manufacturing plant in Nenagh, Co Tipperary.

More than 200 jobs are expected to be lost at the plant.

This afternoon, staff from the Department of Social Protection's Intreo service contacted Hannover Communications, who are working on behalf of Coty, to offer the Department's services, including briefing sessions and the provision of information about employment options, re-training supports, redundancy and welfare.

"This is a very distressing time for employees who have given so much to the company. My thoughts and those of my Government colleagues are with all the staff affected," said Minister Leo Varadkar.

"The Department of Social Protection will do all it can to assist employees, including briefing sessions on welfare and employment supports. Our goal is to ensure that all staff affected can move smoothly into new employment or training.

"I want to assure everyone affected that the Department of Social Protection officials are determined to help them to get through this difficult period, and identify the supports they need to get back into employment again as quickly as possible."

Employees arriving at the Coty Cosmetics Factory in Nenagh to hear if the factory is going to close with the loss of 200 jobs.

Earlier: The loss of more than 200 jobs at the Coty beauty products manufacturing plant in Nenagh, Co Tipperary will be a "huge blow for the town" workers have said, writes David Raleigh.

Workers are meeting management at the former Procter and Gamble (P&G) plant around now (midday) when an announcement will be made to staff about the future of their jobs.

P&G merged with Coty last year in a €11.3bn deal, making it one of the world's leading beauty manufacturing firms in the world, with revenues of over €9million.

Walking into the meeting with management, employee Pauline Walsh, who has been working at the Nenagh plant for the past 23-years was resigned to hearing bad news: "It's coming a long time, we've had nine lives now."

According to Ms Walsh there are 207 people currently working at the plant, which in its heyday with P&G employed over 600.

The jobs are expected to be moved to another Coty plant in England.

"We're expecting bad news. I would expect if we get anything outside of another twelve months before the transition to the other plant then that's a bonus," Ms Walsh, (50), said.

"I'm here 23 years, it's a long time; there big changes coming for me now."

She added: "I'm worried, there's no question I'm worried. I'm that bit older and it's going to be harder for me to get a job. I'm not going to go away with any bad feeling, because they have been very good to me over the years, and I'm grateful for that."

Ms Walsh said: "I'm getting married in August and I've two daughters - one is 20 and I have a 12-year old who I still have to put through college."

"It a huge blow for the town. I'm sad for what damage it will do to the town; there's no major employers in Nenagh anymore. It was pumping a lot of money into the town every year. That's the big issue."

The mother of two called on the government to step in to help staff secure other jobs and try to find another employer for the plant.

"I would like to see the government intervening in some form to try and save it, because the loss to the town is huge, absolutely huge."

"It's sad; it's a sad day for Nenagh," she added.

"I have to say that Proctor and Gamble was a fantastic company to work for the last 22 years. I have nothing bad to say about (P&G), and Coty is doing what it has to do for it's business, I suppose."

"Over the years here there have been many sourcing studies where we have transitioned the bulk of our skincare business to the (Coty plant in Poland) and we have managed to rescue the business from that."

"I feel we have probably run out of our nine lives now."

"There are 207 jobs on site today, but we have had up to 650 people here over the years. There were redundancies with P&G over the years when we've downsized because the skin care business all went to the plant in Poland, which is owned by P&G."

Ms Walsh said there had been rumours the company was going to downsize, but today's expected job losses announcement is still a shock.

"We knew we were in a sourcing study for quiet a while, but that's not unusual in a manufacturing site.

Sourcing studies tend to be ongoing anyway, particularly in the case of multinationals where they have multiple plants."

"We feel that the news is not good. It's a pity. It's a fine site and there's loads of room for expansion."

"It's going to be a huge loss."

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